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In Ireland, there are 4 schools offering Korean.

Lesser-taught Languages

Find about the successes to date of the introduction of lesser-taught languages.

 

Polish Lithuanian Korean 

 

Korean is one of the most recent languages to be added to the post-primary school curriculum in Ireland by the Department of Education and Skills, as a unit for Transition Year. This is being done in the context of one of the goals in Languages Connect Ireland’s Strategy for Foreign Languages in Education, which is to diversify and increase the uptake of languages learned.

4 schools in Dublin are piloting the Korean language unit for Transition Year (around 320 students) for the academic year 2018/19. Korean is the 17th most widely spoken language in the world with approximately 80 million native speakers. South Korea is a key partner for Ireland in Asia; in 2016, total Irish goods exports to South Korea reached €980m; an increase of some 70% on 2015. And total trade in goods and services between the two countries increased to €1.8bn in 2015. There are also over 200 Irish companies active in the South Korean market. The introduction of new trade languages in Irish schools is indicative of the identified need to diversify Ireland’s trading partners globally in the context of Brexit.

To find out more, please contact us.

I am interested in Korean

Census 2016 showed that the Polish community is the biggest national minority living in Ireland with a population of 122,585. Approximately 25,000 of these are children and young people. Across education, there is an imperative to support and capitalise on the multilingual abilities of these individuals as well as fostering the social, cognitive and psychological benefits of heritage language maintenance.

The short course in Polish as a heritage language developed by Post-Primary Languages Initiative aims to maintain and develop students’ proficiency levels in Polish and their knowledge of Polish literature and culture in order to consolidate and deepen their literacy skills and make them more self-aware as learners.

This 100-hour course is based on the Generic Short Course in Modern Languages which was, in turn, developed using the Framework for Junior Cycle (DES, 2015) and the Developing Short Courses in Junior Cycle Handbook. The course provides the ‘learning statements’ and key skills which all short courses are based upon.

This short course is designed to:

  • stimulate students’ interest in the Polish language and culture
  • nurture their desire to maintain proficiency in Polish. 
  • foster an attitude of curiosity and openness to both the heritage culture (Polish) and the newly acquired culture (Irish),
  • encourage students’ participation in a multicultural, cosmopolitan society by appreciating similarities and differences, to observe, reflect and suspend judgement when discovering new cultures while simultaneously reflecting on their own. 

Specification, assessment guidelines and learning journal – click here

Polish is currently offered as a non-curricular Leaving Certificate subject. This is part of a policy of the Department of Education and Skills to offer a Leaving Certificate exam in European Community languages that are not currently on the curriculum. A new Leaving Certificate curriculum specification is currently being developed by the NCCA.

Na stronie poświęconej językowi polskiemu zamieszczone zostały materiały, mające przede wszystkim pomóc studentom, przygotowującym się do egzaminu dojrzałości z języka ojczystego w irlandzkim systemie edukacji. Znajdują się tutaj testy, ćwiczenia doskonalące umiejętność czytania ze zrozumieniem, a także komponowania krótszych i dłuższych wypowiedzi pisemnych, ponadto wskazówki jak unikać błędów oraz linki do stron internetowych o profilu językowym, kulturalnym ihistorycznym.

Polish resources from the PPLI – click here  

Ireland has experienced momentous change over the last two decades, with a sharp reversal in its traditionally outward migration patterns to a very rapid increase in inward migration, particularly noticeable after the accession of ten new EU Member States, including Poland, on May 1st 2004.

Information on Polish complementary schools in Ireland – click here 

According to the official Irish population census, there were 36,683 Lithuanians living in Ireland in 2011. Data of the Lithuanian Department of Statistics (2015) shows that the largest proportion of Lithuanian expats under 14 years old (20.7%) live in Ireland. The Embassy of Lithuania estimates that there were currently approximately 80,000 Lithuanians living in Ireland in 2017. Approximately 16,000 of these are children and young people. Across education, there is an imperative to support and capitalise on the multilingual abilities of young people, not only because of the currently much mooted economic benefits, but also because of the undeniable social, analytical and psychological benefits.

Lithuanian is one of the most recent languages to be added to the post-primary school curriculum in Ireland by the Department of Education and Skills, as a heritage language in Junior Cycle. This is being done in the context of one of the goals in Languages Connect Ireland’s Strategy for Foreign Languages in Education, which is to diversify and increase the uptake of languages learned and cultivate the languages of the new Irish.
Lithuanian has been introduced as a short course for Junior Cycle in a number of schools in Dublin and Monaghan, two of the areas with the highest density of speakers of Lithuanian as a heritage language.

This short course in Lithuanian as a Heritage Language aims to maintain and develop students’ proficiency levels in Lithuanian and their knowledge of Lithuanian literature and culture in order to consolidate and deepen their literacy skills and make them more self-aware as learners.

This 100-hour course is based on the Generic Short Course in Modern Languages which was in turn developed using the Framework for Junior Cycle (DES, 2015) and the Developing Short Courses in Junior Cycle handbook. The course provides the ‘learning statements’ and key skills which all short courses are based upon.

The specification, assessment guidelines and the learning journal are all available here 

Lithuanian is currently offered as a non-curricular Leaving Certificate subject. This is part of a policy of the Department of Education and Skills to offer a Leaving Certificate exam in European Community languages that are not currently on the curriculum.  A new Leaving Certificate curriculum specification is currently being developed by the NCCA.

Resources to support students taking Lithuanian as a non-curricular language at Leaving Certificate – click here.